definition of gambling by The Free Dictionary

When a farmer once got into the habit of going to Cutter, it was like gambling or the lottery; in an hour of discouragement he went back.Or a gambling hell,” said his brother reflectively.That was another thing, the men said–all the saloon-keepers had to be “Indians,” and to put up on demand, otherwise they could not do business on Sundays, nor have any gambling at all.The priests opposed both my fire and life in- surance, on the ground that it was an insolent attempt to hinder the decrees of God; and if you pointed out that they did not hinder the decrees in the least, but only modified the hard consequences of them if you took out policies and had luck, they retorted that that was gambling against the decrees of God, and was just as bad.He brought back one or two new habits with him, one of which he rather openly practiced–tippling–but concealed another, which was gambling.He was a doctor in the neighbourhood when he married her, and a man, I surmised, of some parts and promise, but, moving to town, he had fallen into loose ways, taken to drinking and gambling, and had finally http://networkadvertising.org deserted her for another woman–at the very moment when their first child was born.Your mother’s eyes are bad again; and your brother Berkeley has been gambling, and seems to think I ought to pay his debts for him.Your worship must know that this gentleman has just now won more than a thousand reals in that gambling house opposite, and God knows how.This young man was the nephew of one of the Nob Hill magnates, who run the San Francisco Stock Exchange, much as more humble adventurers, in the corner of some public park at home, may be seen to perform the simple artifice of pea and thimble: for their own profit, that is to say, and the discouragement of public gambling.In fact, I have no intention of going there again, since every one is for gambling, and for nothing but gambling.The only excesses indulged in by this temperate and exemplary people, appear to be gambling and horseracing.I asked, being in an idle mood, because, if an obvious ship’s officer, I was not, as a matter of fact, down at the docks to “look for a berth,” an occupation as engrossing as gambling, and as little favourable to the free exchange of ideas, besides being destructive of the kindly temper needed for casual intercourse with one’s fellow-creatures.

Flora K. Shook

Flora K. Shook

Amateur tv junkie. Proud alcohol trailblazer. Internet aficionado. Music advocate. Falls down a lot. Zombie fanatic. Award-winning communicator.
Flora K. Shook

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